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ALM Adoption Success Story – Success Factor 2 – Visualize Your Work

Humans love pictures.

We have numerous sayings in our cultures about how powerful visualizations are.

A picture is worth a thousand words

“The drawing shows me at one glance what might be spread over ten pages in a book.”

“Every picture tells a story.”

One that the challenges with knowledge work is that for the most part, most of our work is invisible until it’s done. Only Neo can see bits and bytes which leaves the rest of us a little in the dark. If you’re building a building, or digging a hole in the ground, progress is obvious! For invisible work, progress is very difficult to monitor.

So we track work in some software system, but then we hide all of our knowledge in text and numbers! Our love of spreadsheets is epic in proportion. Status reports! MS Project files! All of this data!! For all intents and purposes, our work is still invisible! We often mistake this data for knowledge and understanding and the true insights are left hidden in the numbers.

On our project, we knew it would be very important to understand at a glance where we were in our workflow.  We were doing something very novel for this organization and in order to mitigate the risk of heading too far in the wrong direction (which could be any direction at this point), we needed knowledge. We needed to quickly identify roadblocks to progress, which often included self-inflicted delays. We needed to engage with our sponsor in a meaningful manner.

So we started drawing pictures!

The most important “picture” that we have used has been our storyboard. This board is very important to us. It is a muster point for our daily stand-up meetings. It is a place on which to hang “adornments” that help us quickly assess our current state. It is a tool that promotes conversations. And it is always there, silently reminding us to be disciplined with efforts to visualize our work.

teampulse_storyboard

Our storyboard looks like pretty much like any other Agile teams storyboard in form, but this one is a unique work of art. Well, unique in that it is exactly what we need it to be at the moment. It represents our workflow. We have our WIP limits on it. And because we are fairly disciplined in maintaining the current state of all our work, it’s always up to date.

We also visualize our tasks and review these daily as well. TeamPulse has a story board as well as a task board for more granular visualizations.

teampulse_taskboard

teampulse_taskboard_2

We don’t have WIP limits enabled on the tasks boards, but again, the intent is to see work flowing through the system. And with an explicit policy that tasks should have a cycle time of 1 day, any time an item is discussed at 2 stand-up meetings, the team knows that the work isn’t progressing as expected and some sort of investigation and corrective action may need to take place.

Finally, we use TeamPulse dashboards to visualize our progress over the course of an iteration.

teampulse_dashboard

Everyday, we review the storyboards and the tasks boards during our stand-up, and then we review the dashboards to bring the entire conversation back to our progress versus our (the team’s) expectations for the iteration. These dashboards provide that high-level perspective that ties everything back together.

And all of this information is available on the web, to everyone on the project team, including the sponsor. There is no need to interpret numbers. There isn’t a report that needs to be compiled. And the information we want to present is immediately available in a very easy to consume and impactful format because a picture is worth a thousand words!

Going back to the first ALM Adoption Success Factor of Transparency, having something to be transparent with has been a key enabler of success for our team as we strive to deliver this project and continuously improve and get better as we do it.

Series List

  1. Success Factor 1 – Transparency
  2. Success Factor 2 – Visualize Your Work
  3. Coming soon – Success Factor 3 – Co-location
  4. Coming soon – Success Factor 4 – Invest In Your Tools
  5. Coming soon – Success Factor 5 – Retrospectives

Thought-leaders – “Centers of Gravity” for Knowledge and Learning

I’m a consultant. I’ve been very fortunate to fall into this line of work and I really love what I do.

One of the hard parts of being a consultant though is “staying ahead of the curve”. A consultant is only as good as the skills he possesses and our industry is constantly (and successfully) striving to make our current knowledge and skillset obsolete.

So I do the things that most consultants do. I practice what I know and try new things. I read books. I surf the web. I have my favorite blogs. I use twitter lists to follow people who are aligned with particular interests of mine. And this has been a good tactic for keeping up.

At some point though, I started going to conferences and this is when my growth as a practitioner in my profession started to go to the next level.

I remember the first time I saw a industry luminary, Don Box. At the time, he was really ramping up SOAP, XML, Messaging, all that goodness of the early 2000s. The content of his talk was all available on the web or in books but that wasn’t what I really got from his presentation. In hindsight I’ve realized the true value I took from that experience was his passion for the topics and his stories! I came back from that conference pumped about those technologies and finding exciting new ways to use them! And boy is XML, SOAP and messaging exciting!! <smirk>

Fast forward a bit and now I’m a consultant who is trying to be better at helping individuals, teams and organizations be better and I’m doing this at an amazing time in our industry. Agile is going full steam ahead. Lean and Kanban are entering the process space and starting to make significant inroads. There is a lot to learn and discover, validate or refute. And this is where the thought-leaders come in.

This might sounds obvious, but thought-leaders are really interested in the things they are leading in! They are deeply interested in why “it” works or how they can apply “it” to a new problem. They want to break or validate their thoughts or have them refuted because they are passionate about making “it” better. It’s been my observation that they aren’t normally as interested in applying their specific knowledge to someone else’s problem like most of the rest of us.

It is this unique environment that thought-leaders create around themselves that presents an amazing learning opportunity to the rest of us.

Let me use an example that is fresh in my mind. I’m really interested in The Kanban Method. I think it has the potential to change the way that we all work. But there is a lot to learn and I also want to make sure I’m challenging the method and myself continuously. Enter David Anderson, Kanban thought-leader.

Now David is a really smart guy and he is passionate about his art. He’s a “center of gravity” in the Kanban universe right now. And the really cool thing about that is the attraction of all things Kanban, good and bad, to that center of gravity. If you put yourself in proximity to that center of gravity, virtually or physically, you will be exposed to so many ideas, good and bad, about Kanban. You’re also going to be exposed to the passion to evangelize and grow that David brings to the community.

When I became interested in Kanban I:

  • Attended a leadership course with David
  • Attended LSSC12 in Boston and Kanban Leadership Retreat in San Diego
  • Started following a lot of people in the Kanban community on twitter, finding them because many of them followed David
  • Started following blogs of people in the Kanban community, many found from being in the mix with that community
  • Got involved in leading-edge questions and challenges with the method, many of which are being discussed by David

I had the same experience with Scrum. My perspective on Scrum was completely opened up by spending a couple days in a course with Ken Schwaber. His perspective on Scrum was so different than anyone else’s, he is very passionate about Scrum and it was such a great learning experience.  I also started following @Scrumdotorg on twitter and recognized the value in finding an anchor within that community!

I had the same experience technically with CQRS, an application architectural design pattern. When I became interested in that, I started following thought-leaders in that space.

All of the “technologies” that we use have these centers of gravity that attract all of the good and bad. And there is so much learning to be gained from being in these environments!

So it’s my challenge to you today to go and find a center of gravity in a technology you are really interested in. Find a thought-leader on twitter or find their blog. Find a conference that they will be speaking at and attend. Ask them a question, or ask the community around them a question! Get involved with the communities that are swirling around these thought-leaders and take full advantage of the learning opportunities that will present themselves!

ALM Adoption Success Story – Success Factor 1 – Transparency

This is a story about my job, which I love.

During the day, I’m a mild-mannered process consultant (read: Lean/Agile evangelist) for Imaginet, a technology consulting firm that provides end-to-end software development services primarily specializing in Microsoft products and technologies. The really cool thing about Imaginet is that we are large enough to be able to help companies with projects that span the full lifecycle of solutions development, or Application Lifecycle Management as it is more well known. And these projects often involve helping organizations adopt, refine or improve their existing ALM processes.

That is the part that I get excited about. As a process consultant and change agent, I get to help companies take their development processes to the next level and build an organizational culture that is capable of continuing that growth.

It was in this context that our current client engaged us. They were going to build a team that was expected to build a mobile transportation solution that would help them manage a fleet of trucks. This client had never had a core competency in software development but realized that in order to realize their vision, they would need to become competent as there was no off-the-shelf solution that would fit their needs. They did have experience with traditionally managed knowledge work projects and really felt that this was not going to lead to a successful project. There were far too many unknowns and risks and they knew they would need to learn and adapt very quickly throughout the project.

So we all decided to adopt an Agile/Lean mindset and build a process that would help us deliver in this challenging situation.

This long preamble is really just setting the stage for me to share with you what I think were the 5 core principles that we used on this project to ensure that the mindset and methodology development worked and became institutionalized. I’m hoping that by showing you how they affected the way that we work and the benefits, you’ll be able to learn from us and see if they could work for you. This 5-part series won’t be as much about the methodology we ended up with as much as it is about how we ensured that the right methodology for the organization and project emerged and that we maximized our chances of success.

Success Factor 1 – Transparency

The first core principle that we followed was to provide as much transparency into everything that we did, the information that we had and the challenges that we faced. We were so focused on this transparency that it actually tended to border on continuous broadcasting.

In an environment where there is a lot of uncertainty and risk, we felt that it was crucial to our success that we get as much information as possible from as many sources as possible and to engage anyone who could help us succeed. And with a project sponsor who was taking a significant risk in building a new competency for his organization, it was important that he see how we were working, the challenges we faced, and that we were always looking to improve the way that we worked.

To that end, we used numerous tactics to provide as much information on how we were working at a glance to anyone who was interested. These tactics included:

  • a big team room which encouraged information sharing and broadcasting
  • digital storyboard (work management system) that was projected onto a screen at all times and accessible anytime from a browser
  • daily stand-up meetings where anyone was invited to attend
  • iteration planning and retrospective meetings every 2 weeks, anyone could attend and the outcomes of these meetings were left in plain sight for anyone to see
  • team Skype account that would auto-answer (silently I might add) and project onto the screen, with a live video feed and multiple microphones in the room
  • Skype accounts and webcams for all team members
  • tons of whiteboards and large post-it notes that we write on continuously – every wall in the room (600+ sq. ft room) was covered in information and updated frequently
  • large post-it notes on the wall outside the team room to notify anyone walking past in the hall
  • email notification of significant events in the development process (e.g. broken builds, server outages)

 

WP_002280WP_002277WP_002281WP_002284

And it is working!

Our sponsor, who sits across the hall, frequently comes into the room and sees exactly what the team is doing. Our openness has fostered a culture of trust between him and the team that allows both to ask questions, provide inputs, and make decisions for the good of the project together. And one of the really cool aspects of his interactions with us is that he very rarely comes in and asks us how we are doing or where the project is at. He already knows! He usually comes in asking about a specific item we are working on, or asking if he can help with one of our problems.

We never have to defend our methodology because we are constantly sharing it with everyone and allowing them to participate in its improvement. This is one of the hard parts of an Agile adoption project that is easily avoided by aggressively being transparent.

Another benefit of this level of openness is that when we have brought on a new team member, which has happened several times, they are immediately immersed in a LOT of project information. This ranges from work in progress, upcoming stories, improvement work items from the retrospective and any risks or challenges that we are actively facing. We also have numerous big PostIt notes that contain the values and principles that we have chosen to follow as we evolve our methodology. How we perceive value, prioritize and the core vision for the product is all up on the walls all the time.

We have received help from a variety of people within the organization who saw something that we had on our boards that they could help with. These helpful acts ranged from sharing critical bits of information that helped us make a much better decision to actually removing a roadblock or impediment from our current blockages. And without this level of transparency, there is a good chance that these helpful acts would have been delayed if they had even arrived at all.

Transparency has been, and will continue to be, a significant cultural aspect of our team that we feel helps drive our success.

Do you have any transparency tactics you’d like to share? Please do! Comments and thoughts are always encouraged!

Cheers.
Dave

p.s. I plan to enhance this post with pictures soon, but I’m under a deadline to get this out (thanks Dylan) so they’ll have to wait! Please check back in the next couple days.

p.p.s. This blog is being inspired by a competition between a bunch of us to see who fails the blogging frequency requirement first! Please check out the blogs of all these other awesome guys and encourage them to keep on blogging too!

Series List

  1. Success Factor 1 – Transparency
  2. Success Factor 2 – Visualize Your Work
  3. Coming soon – Success Factor 3 – Co-location
  4. Coming soon – Success Factor 4 – Invest In Your Tools
  5. Coming soon – Success Factor 5 – Retrospectives